Episode 109: Tesslynn O’Cull (Part 2)

Last week, I told you the first part of the story of three-year-old Tesslynn O’Cull, whose murder in 1997 became known as the worst case of child abuse in Oregon’s history. After Tesslynn’s battered body was found in a shallow grave, her mother, 21-year-old Stella Kiser, and the woman’s live-in boyfriend, 20-year-old Jesse Compton, were charged with murder.

This week, I’ll tell you the rest of Tesslynn’s story, discussing Stella’s two jury trials, Jesse’s attempts to have his conviction and death sentence overturned, and more about who Tesslynn was. You’ll also hear my conversation with Tesslynn’s maternal uncle, her mother’s twin brother, Billy Kiser, who was the only person who intervened to try to save his niece and who still thinks about her every day.

This is part two of the horrific story of Tesslynn O’Cull.

Links discussed in this episode: 

Never Forget Tesslynn O’Cull Facebook group  

Dala’s Blue Angels Facebook group

Dala’s Blue Angels website

Photos related to today’s episode can be viewed on Facebook and Instagram:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sufferthelittlechildrenpod
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sufferthelittlechildrenpod

You can also follow the podcast on Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, and TikTok.

My Linktree is available here.

Please help make the show my full-time gig to keep the weekly episodes coming! By supporting me on Patreon, you’ll also access rewards, including a shout-out by name on the podcast and exclusive gifts. Pledges of $5 or more per month access ad-free versions of my regular Wednesday episodes (starting with episode #88). Pledges of $10 or more per month access a small but growing collection of Patreon-exclusive bonus minisodes!

This podcast is researched, written, hosted, edited, and produced by Laine.

For more stories like this one, visit Suffer the Little Children Blog.

Music for this episode is from Audio Jungle.

Subscribe to Suffer the Little Children on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spreaker, Pandora, Spotify, iHeartRadio, or your favorite podcast listening platform.

Episode 108: Tesslynn O’Cull (Part 1)

On June 17, 1997, police in Springfield, Oregon found the battered, desecrated body of three-year-old Tesslynn O’Cull buried in a shallow grave. The torture perpetrated against Tesslynn by her mother’s boyfriend, 20-year-old Jesse Compton, and knowingly allowed by her mother, 21-year-old Stella Kiser, was cruel beyond belief, and both were immediately charged in Tesslynn’s murder, which became known as the worst case of child abuse in Oregon’s history.

This is the story of a sweet little girl who loved animals, drawing, and her bath toys. It’s also the story of the many failures that led to her brutal and preventable death, highlighting the importance of reporting suspected child abuse.

This is part one of the horrific story of Tesslynn O’Cull.

Links discussed in this episode: 

Never Forget Tesslynn O’Cull Facebook group

Photos related to today’s episode can be viewed on Facebook and Instagram:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sufferthelittlechildrenpod
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sufferthelittlechildrenpod

You can also follow the podcast on Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, and TikTok.

My Linktree is available here.

Please help make the show my full-time gig to keep the weekly episodes coming! By supporting me on Patreon, you’ll also access rewards, including a shout-out by name on the podcast and exclusive gifts. Pledges of $5 or more per month access ad-free versions of my regular Wednesday episodes (starting with episode #88). Pledges of $10 or more per month access a small but growing collection of Patreon-exclusive bonus minisodes!

This podcast is researched, written, hosted, edited, and produced by Laine.

For more stories like this one, visit Suffer the Little Children Blog.

Music for this episode is from Audio Jungle.

Subscribe to Suffer the Little Children on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spreaker, Pandora, Spotify, iHeartRadio, or your favorite podcast listening platform.